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Do you suffer with unexplained symptoms such as headaches, sleep problems and dizziness following exposure to electromagnetic fields? You could be suffering from this condition.

Long-term cell phone use increases brain cancer risk

According to a recent CDC survey Survey, for the first time more American households have cell phones than land lines. Meanwhile the evidence keeps accruing that long term cell phone use appears to increase brain cancer risk.

In the U.S. the lifetime risk of developing glioma, the most common brain cancer, is between 1 in 200 and 1 in 250. If the risk increased by 40% due to cell phone use, the likelihood of developing glioma during your lifetime would be between 1 in 140 and 1 in 180. If the risk doubles, the lifetime risk of developing glioma would be between 1 in 100 and 1 in 125.

Four major reviews of the research on cell phone use and brain tumor risk have been published in peer-reviewed journals this year. All of these studies report finding a statistically significant relationship between cell phone use of ten or more years and brain tumor risk especially on the side of the head where the cell phone was predominantly placed during phone calls (i.e., ipsilateral use).

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Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young children

Source:

American Academy of Pediatrics

Summary:

As the number of smart phones, tablets, electronic games and other handheld screens in US homes continues to grow, some children begin using these devices before beginning to talk. New research suggests these children may be at higher risk for speech delays.

As the number of smart phones, tablets, electronic games and other handheld screens in U.S. homes continues to grow, some children begin using these devices before beginning to talk. New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests these children may be at higher risk for speech delays. Researchers will present the abstract, "Is handheld screen time use associated with language delay in infants?" on Saturday, May 6 at the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco. The study included 894 children between ages 6 months and 2 years participating in TARGet Kids!, a practice-based research network in Toronto between 2011 and 2015.

By their 18-month check-ups, 20 percent of the children had daily average handheld device use of 28 minutes, according to their parents. Based on a screening tool for language delay, researchers found that the more handheld screen time a child's parent reported, the more likely the child was to have delays in expressive speech. For each 30-minute increase in handheld screen time, researchers found a 49 percent increased risk of expressive speech delay. There was no apparent link between handheld device screen time and other communications delays, such as social interactions, body language or gestures. "Handheld devices are everywhere these days," said Dr. Catherine Birken, MD, MSc, FRCPC, the study's principal investigator and a staff pediatrician and scientist at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids). "While new pediatric guidelines suggest limiting screen time for babies and toddlers, we believe that the use of smartphones and tablets with young children has become quite common. This is the first study to report an association between handheld screen time and increased risk of expressive language delay."

Dr. Birken said the results support a recent policy recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics to discourage any type of screen media in children younger than 18 months. More research is needed, she said, to understand the type and contents of screen activities infants are engaging in to further explore mechanisms behind the apparent link between handheld screen time and speech delay, such as time spent together with parents on handheld devices, and to understand the impact on in-depth and longer-term communication outcomes in early childhood.

Lead author Julia Ma, HBSc, an MPH student at the University of Toronto, will present the abstract, "Is handheld screen time use associated with language delay in infants?" at 10:30 a.m.

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EMR Updates: The Microwave Factor

ABSTRACT

A type 1 diabetic male reports multiple instances when his blood glucose was dramatically elevated by the presence of microwave radiation from wireless technology and plummeted when the radiation exposure ended. In one instance, his body temperature elevated in addition to his blood glucose. Both remained elevated for nearly 48 h after exposure with the effect gradually decreasing. Possible mechanisms for microwave radiation elevating blood glucose include effects on glucose transport proteins and ion channels, insulin conformational changes and oxidative stress. Temperature elevation may be caused by microwave radiation-triggered Ca 2+ efflux, a mechanism similar to malignant hyperthermia. The potential for radiation from wireless technology to cause serious biological effects has important implications and necessitates a reevaluation of its near-ubiquitous presence, especially in hospitals and medical facilities.

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The Swedish No Risk Project

During the 1990’s the Swedish Union of Clerical and Technical Employees in Industry (SiF) instigated research into reports of electro-magnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) in the modern information technology (IT) workplace with a possible link with chemical emissions from new electronic equipment.

The research team at SiF were concerned that the information technology (IT) workplace may be creating new and serious risks to health, as a result SiF initiated the No-Risk project which aimed at addressing all possible health hazards in the modern office-place. In 1999 SiF initiated the “Healthy Office project” in partnership with the Luleå University of Technology (LTU).

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